Chapter 19a. Latin to English Flashcards Preview

Wheelock's Latin Translation > Chapter 19a. Latin to English > Flashcards

Flashcards in Chapter 19a. Latin to English Deck (55):
1

1. Quis lībertātem eōrum eō tempore dēlēre coepit?

1. Who started to destroy their [male] freedom at that time?

2

2. Cuius lībertās ab istō auctōre deinde dēlēta est?

2. Whose [sg.] freedom was next destroyed by that author (of yours)?

3

3. Quōs librōs bonōs poēta caecus heri recitāvit?

3. What good books did the blind poet recite yesterday?

4

4. Fēminae librōs difficilēs crās legent quōs mīsistī.

4. Tomorrow the women will read the difficult books which you [sg.] sent.

5

5. Omnia flūmina in mare fluunt et cum eō miscentur.

5. All rivers flow into the sea and are mixed with it.

6

6. Itaque id genus lūdōrum levius, quod ā multīs familiīs laudābātur, nōs ipsī numquam cupimus.

6. And so we ourselves [male] have never desired this kind of sport [lit. plural], which was praised by many households.

7

7. Puerī et puellae propter facta bona ā mātribus patribusque quoque laudātae erunt.

7. The boys and girls will also have been praised by (their) mothers and fathers because of (their) good deeds.

8

8. Cūr istī vēritātem timēbant, quā multī adiūtī erant?

8. Why were these (horrible people) [male] afraid of the truth, by which many (people) had been helped?

9

9. Hostēs trāns ingēns flūmen in Graeciā deinde cito nāvigāre incēpērunt.

9. The enemy [lit. plural] next began to navigate quickly across the huge river in Greece.

10

10. Qui vir fortis clārusque, dē quō lēgistī, aetātem brevem mortemque celerem exspectābat?

10. Which brave and famous man, about whom you have read, was expecting a short life and quick death?

11

11. Quae studia gravia tē semper dēlectant, aut quae nunc dēsīderās?

11. What serious studies always please you [sg.], or which ones do you now desire?

12

12. Who [sg.] saw the six men who had prepared to do this?

12. Quis sex virōs vīdit quī parāverant hōc facere?

13

13. What was neglected by the second student [male] yesterday?

13. Quid neglēctum est heri ā secundō discipulō?

14

14. We [female] were helped by the knowledge which had been neglected by him.

14. Adiūtae sumus scientiā quae ab eō neglēcta erat.

15

15a. Whose [sg.] plans did the old men of all those cities fear?

15a. Cuius cōnsilia senēs omnium urbium illārum timēbant?

16

15b. Which plans did they esteem?

15b. Quae cōnsilia dīligēbant?

17

1. Quae est nātūra animī? Est mortālis.

1. What is the nature of the soul? It is mortal.

18

2. Illa argūmenta vīsa sunt et gravia et certa.

2. Those arguments seemed both serious and reliable.

19

3. Quid nōs facere contrā istōs et scelera eōrum dēbēmus?

3. What should we do against those (dreadful people) and their crimes?

20

4a. Quid ego ēgī?

4a. What have I done?

21

4b. In quod perīculum iactus sum?

4b. Into what danger have I been thrown?

22

5a. Ō dī immortālēs! In quā urbe vīvimus?

5a. O immortal gods! In what city are we living?

23

5b. Quam cīvitātem habēmus?

5b. What (kind of a) state do we have?

24

5c. Quae scelera vidēmus?

5c. What crimes are we seeing?

25

6. Quī sunt bonī cīvēs nisi eī quī officiō moventur et beneficia patriae memoriā tenent?

6. Who are (the) good men unless (it’s) those who are moved by duty and hold the benefits of (their) country in (their) memory?

26

7a. Alia, quae pecūniā parantur, ab eō stultō parāta sunt;

7a. Other (things), which are prepared with money, have been prepared by that foolish one [lit. “him.”]

27

7b. at mōrēs eius vērōs amīcōs parāre nōn potuērunt.

7b. but his character [lit. plural] could not prepare true friends [male.].

28

1. Quam multa senēs in mentibus tenent!

1. How many (things) do old men hold in (their) minds!

29

2. Sī studium grave et labor et probitās in senectūte remanent,

2. If serious study and effort and honesty continue,

30

3. saepe manent etiam memoria, scientia, sapientiaque.

3. often also memory, and knowledge, and wisdom remain.

31

4. Sophoclēs, scrīptor ille Graecus, ad summam senectūtem tragoediās fēcit;

4. Sophocles, that (famous) Greek writer, created tragedies into extreme old age;

32

5. sed propter hoc studium familiam neglegere vidēbātur ...

5. but because of this enthusiam he seemed to neglect (his) household ...

33

6. et ā filiīs in iūdicium vocātus est.

6. and was summoned to trial by his sons.

34

7. Tum auctor eam tragoediam quam sēcum habuit et quam proximē scrīpserat “Oedipum Colōnēum,” iūdicibus recitāvit.

7. Then the author recited to the judges that tragedy which he had with him and which he had written most recently, (namely) “Oedipus of Colonus.”

35

10. Ubi haec tragoedia recitāta est, senex sententiīs iūdicum est līberātus.

8. When this tragedy was recited, the old man was freed by the opinions of the judges.

36

Catullus' poem 8 is written in “limping iambs” (also called scazons or choliambics).   Each line has five iambs (∪ –) followed by either a trochee (– ∪) or a spondee (–  –).   The first short syllable of the first and third iambs can be replaced by a long.   Thus:
_              _
∪ -  ∪  -  ∪ - ∪ - ∪ - ∪ - -x

The meter is associated with the insulting poems of the Greek poet Hipponax (6th century BCE); in Catullus' poem the poet mocks himself rather than an enemy.

37

2a. read aloud in meter:

 

Valē puella—iam Catullus obdūrat.

2a.

 

wahlEH, pooEHLah—YAHM CahTOOLuhs OHBDOORAHT.

38

2b. translate:

 

Valē puella—iam Catullus obdūrat.

2b.

 

Goodby girl, now Catullus endures.

39

3a. read aloud in meter:

 

Scelesta, vae tē! Quae tibī manet vīta?

3a.

 

SkehlEHSTah VIE TAY KWHY tihBEE mahnEHT WEETah?

40

3b. translate:

 

Scelesta, vae tē! Quae tibī manet vīta?

3b.

 

Wicked one (female)! Woe to you! What life remains for your?

41

4a. read aloud in meter:

 

Quis nunc tē adībit? Cui vidēberis bella?

4a.

 

KWISS NOONK TAY ahDEEbiht? KWEE wihDAYbehrIHS BEHLLah?

42

4b. translate:

 

Quis nunc tē adībit? Cui vidēberis bella?

4b.

 

Who will visit you now? To whom will you appear pretty?

43

5a. read aloud in meter:

 

Quem nunc amābis? Cuius esse dīcēris?

5a.

 

KWEHM NOONK ahMAHBIHS? KOOyuss EHSSEH DEEKAYRiss?

44

5b. translate:

 

Quem nunc amābis? Cuius esse dīcēris?

5b.

 

Whom now will you love? Whose will you be said to be?

45

6a. read aloud in meter:

 

Quem bāsiābis? Cui labella mordēbis?

6a.

 

KWEHM BAHSihAHBiss? KWEE lahbEHLLah MOHRDAYbiss?

46

6a. translate:

 

Quem bāsiābis? Cui labella mordēbis?

6b.

 

Whom will you kiss? Whose [lit: dative, for whom / to the disadvantage of whom] lips will you bite?

47

7a. read aloud in meter:

 

At tū, Catulle, dēstinātus obdūrā

7a.

 

AHT TOO, CahTOOLeh, DAYsihnAHTus OBDOORAH.

48

7b. translate:

 

At tū, Catulle, dēstinātus obdūrā.

7b.

 

But you, Catullus, resolved, be strong.

49

8. Valē puella—iam Catullus obdūrat... Scelesta, vae tē! Quae tibi manet vīta? Scelesta, vae tē! Quae tibī manet vīta? Quis nunc tē adībit? Cui vidēberis bella? Quis nunc tē adībit? Cui vidēberis bella? Quem nunc amābis? Cuius esse dīcēris? Quem nunc amābis? Cuius esse dīcēris? Quem bāsiābis? Cui labella mordēbis? Quem bāsiābis? Cui labella mordēbis? At tū, Catulle, dēstinātus obdūrā.

8. read the whole poem in meter

50

 

Martial 14.37 is written in a meter known as hendecasyllabic (“having eleven syllables”), used in some of the most famous poems of Catullus.  Although the either of the first two syllables can be short, they are usually long (as here).

-  -  - ∪ ∪ - ∪ - ∪ -  x

The meter is also known as Phalaecian (after an obscure Greek poet named Phalaecus).  It has a bouncy, syncopated, rhythm giving a colloquial flavor.

51

2a. read aloud in meter:

 

Sēlectōs nisi dās mihī libellōs.

2a.

 

SAYLEHKTOSE nisih DAHS mihHE libEHLLOSE

52

2b. translate:

 

Sēlectōs nisi dās mihī libellōs,

2b.

 

Unless you’re giving me carefully chosen (little) books,

 

 

Notice how in a line of poetry the connecting word is often moved away from the intitial position; often, as here, you should translate the connecting word first.

53

3a. read aloud in meter:

 

admittam tineās trucēsque blattās!

3a.

 

AHDMIHTAHM tihnehAHS truhKAYSkweh BLAHTTAHS.

54

3b. translate: admittam tineās trucēsque blattās!

3b. I’ll let in the bookworms and truculent cockroaches.

55

4. read the poem in meter

 

Sēlectōs nisi dās mihī libellōs,

admittam tineās trucēsque blattās!

4. read the whole poem in meter

 

(audio file to be posted)

 

 

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