9.12 Pharmacology 3 Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in 9.12 Pharmacology 3 Deck (30)
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1

components on or within the cell to which a substance binds

receptors

2

How do surface receptors act as ion channels?

directly alter membrane permeability

3

How do surface receptors act to directly influence cell function?

enzymatically

4

Purpose of surface receptors linking to regulatory proteins

regulatory proteins control other chemical or enzymatic processes

5

affinity

- attraction of a drug to a receptor
- determines how it will bind and react

6

efficacy

How well a drug binds and reacts to with a receptor

7

How do drugs affect change through binding?

The drug finds and occupies a receptor, then somehow interacts with it to change cell function

8

agonist

drug that can bind to a receptor and initiate a change

9

What do agonist drugs have?

- affinity
- efficacy

10

Antagonists ONLY have

affinity

11

How do antagonists work?

- binds to receptor
- does not initiate a change
- blocks the effect of another chemical and prevents action

12

antagonists aka

blockers

13

beta blockers are used to treat

HTN

14

competitive antagonist

both the agonist and the antagonist have an equal opportunity to occupy the receptor

15

For a competitive antagonist vs. an agonist, which will win out for receptor spots?

whichever has the highest concentration

16

What happens if a competitive antagonist "wins"?

inhibition

17

Competitive antagonists generally require a (higher/lower) concentration. Why?

- higher concentration
- weak bones

18

noncompetitive antagonist

- irreversible
- strong bonds formed
- cannot be displaced by the agonist

19

How long do noncompetitive antagonist drugs last?

- entire lifespan of the cell
- usually several days

20

partial agonist

- don't get a full response

21

Partial agonists have:

- affinity
- don't have full efficacy

22

Clinical advantage to partial agonist drugs?

fewer side effects
(i.e. cardiovascular and antipsychotics)

23

mixed agonist-antagonist

can stimulate certain receptors while blocking others

24

Example of mixed agonist-antagonist

selective estrogen receptor modulator (ex. tamoxifen used in breast cancer)

25

How does tamoxifen work as a mixed agonist-antagonist?

- stimulates estrogen receptors to prevent osteoporosis
- blocks effects on breast tissue to prevent cancer

26

inverse agonist

- binds to same receptor as an agonist
- has opposite effect

27

Uses for inverse agonists?

- could slow down overstimlulated receptors
- research in antipsychotics and beta blockers

28

desensitization

- cell becomes less responsive
- can decrease active receptors

29

down-regulation

slower version of desensitization

30

super sensitivity

cell becomes more responsive

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